Tag Archives: Tempranillo

#Food and #wine pairings for International #TempranilloDay ¡Salud!

10 Nov

Chicas y chicos, today is International Tempranillo Day, and we’re gonna hop into the Vino Time Machine for this “Mucho Gusto” post from a couple years ago that will give you everything you need to know about Tempranillo. ¡Salud!

My favorite wine anecdote is one I could share during one of those silly business “icebreakers” where you have to tell a group of complete strangers your most embarrassing moment. I was talking vino at a party with some people I’d just met and I mentioned a Tempranillo I had tried at a new tapas bar that had opened nearby. Being a Latina, I pronounced the word “tapas” with a native Spanish accent.

I started getting uncomfortable looks from the others, and finally one of them cleared his throat and said, “Um, you go to topless bars?”

For the record, I do not, but if you ever find yourself at a Spanish-themed topless bar–or at a restaurant with an eclectic wine list–here’s all you need to know about Tempranillo.

15Rioja_Tempranillo Day InfoGraphic.indd

Image courtesy of Rioja Wine.

HOLA, ME LLAMO: Tempranillo, a red wine, gets its name from the Spanish word temprano, which means early (the grape ripens early). Depending on where you are, Tempranillo goes by a host of aliases: Cencibel, Ull de Lliebre, Tinto del País or Tinto del Toro in other regions of Spain; Tinta Roriz or Tinta Aragones in Portugal; and Tempranilla in Argentina.

MY ROOTS: Tempranillo’s birthplace is the Rioja region of Spain, but some folks think that it was brought there by French monks who were making the pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela. Tempranillo is the core grape of red Rioja wines, where it’s often blended with Garnacha. It’s also one of the main red grapes in Ribera del Duero, where it’s been used for more than 100 years at the prestigious Vega Sicilia winery. Today, Tempranillo is grown in Mexico, California, Italy, Argentina, Australia and South Africa.

ALL ABOUT ME: If you like cherry and plum on the palate, you’ll enjoy Tempranillo. Grapes that were grown in iron-rich soil may show some iron-mineral notes. When it’s aged, Tempranillo displays beautiful caramel, tobacco and tea leaf aromas. This is a dry wine with medium tannins, medium alcohol and medium to high acidity.

FOODS I LOVE: Break out the jamón serrano and the chorizo. Tempranillo is dreamy with a charcuterie plate, and if you happen to be at a tapas bar, it’s a great match for croquetas (ham croquettes), meatballs in tomato sauce and pinches (lamb or pork kabobs). Tempranillo is also tasty with roasted lamb and Indian food.

DO TRY THIS AT HOME: A bottle of Tempranillo can cost anywhere from $10 to $300. Some budget-friendly wines worth trying include: Luis Alegre Koden 2011, Sancho Barón 2009, Lar de Sotomayor Vendimia Seleccoinada 2010, and from Mexico, Alximia Alma 2012.

Something to ponder as you sip your next glass of Tempranillo: You can enjoy Tempranillo and still keep your top on, while getting your tapas on.

Happy #TempranilloDay! Fun facts and #food pairing tips for this popular Spanish #wine

12 Nov

Chicas y chicos, today is Tempranillo Day, and in this “Mucho Gusto” post from 2014, you’ll have all the fun facts you’ll need to impress your friends–and your palate–with your knowledge of one of Spain’s most popular vinos. A shout-out to the fine folks at Rioja Wine for providing the bee-you-tee-ful graphic featured in this post. 

My favorite wine anecdote is one I could share during one of those silly business “icebreakers” where you have to tell a group of complete strangers your most embarrassing moment. I was talking vino at a party with some people I’d just met and I mentioned a Tempranillo I had tried at a new tapas bar that had opened nearby. Being a Latina, I pronounced the word “tapas” with a native Spanish accent.

I started getting uncomfortable looks from the others, and finally one of them cleared his throat and said, “Um, you go to topless bars?”

For the record, I do not, but if you ever find yourself at a Spanish-themed topless bar–or at a restaurant with an eclectic wine list–here’s all you need to know about Tempranillo.

Image courtesy of Rioja Wine.

Image courtesy of Rioja Wine.

HOLA, ME LLAMO: Tempranillo, a red wine, gets its name from the Spanish word temprano, which means early (the grape ripens early). Depending on where you are, Tempranillo goes by a host of aliases: Cencibel, Ull de Lliebre, Tinto del País or Tinto del Toro in other regions of Spain; Tinta Roriz or Tinta Aragones in Portugal; and Tempranilla in Argentina.

MY ROOTS: Tempranillo’s birthplace is the Rioja region of Spain, but some folks think that it was brought there by French monks who were making the pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela. Tempranillo is the core grape of red Rioja wines, where it’s often blended with Garnacha. It’s also one of the main red grapes in Ribera del Duero, where it’s been used for more than 100 years at the prestigious Vega Sicilia winery. Today, Tempranillo is grown in Mexico, California, Italy, Argentina, Australia and South Africa.

ALL ABOUT ME: If you like cherry and plum on the palate, you’ll enjoy Tempranillo. Grapes that were grown in iron-rich soil may show some iron-mineral notes. When it’s aged, Tempranillo displays beautiful caramel, tobacco and tea leaf aromas. This is a dry wine with medium tannins, medium alcohol and medium to high acidity.

FOODS I LOVE: Break out the jamón serrano and the chorizo. Tempranillo is dreamy with a charcuterie plate, and if you happen to be at a tapas bar, it’s a great match for croquetas (ham croquettes), meatballs in tomato sauce and pinches (lamb or pork kabobs). Tempranillo is also tasty with roasted lamb and Indian food.

DO TRY THIS AT HOME: A bottle of Tempranillo can cost anywhere from $10 to $300. Some budget-friendly wines worth trying include: Luis Alegre Koden 2011, Sancho Barón 2009, Lar de Sotomayor Vendimia Seleccoinada 2010, and from Mexico, Alximia Alma 2012.

Something to ponder as you sip your next glass of Tempranillo: You can enjoy Tempranillo and still keep your top on, while getting your tapas on.

¡Salud!

#Vino 101: four of Spain’s most popular #wine grapes

24 Sep

The coolest substitute teachers I can recall were the ones who showed movies during class time. Little did I realize they were doing this to preserve their sanity more than to entertain us. So today I give you a fun little  vino video that will introduce you to four of España’s most popular wine grapes–albariño, verdejo, tempranillo, garnacha. You’ll also get some food pairing suggestions. And all this in under three minutes!

As you may have guessed, part of the reason I’m sharing a video in this week’s post is to prevent a meltdown as I prepare for a midterm exam in my Financial Management class (cue horror-movie shriek sound). So sit back, pour yourself a refreshing glass of Albariño, and enjoy the video. Oh, and wish me luck on my exam!

P.S. Muchas gracias to the fine folks at Wines from Spain for making my life a little easier today. ¡Salud!

WIne of Spain Bull

¡Mucho Gusto! Get to know Tempranillo

29 May

My favorite wine anecdote is one I could share during one of those silly business “icebreakers” where you have to tell a group of complete strangers your most embarrassing moment. I was talking vino at a party with some people I’d just met and I mentioned a Tempranillo I had tried at a new tapas bar that had opened nearby. Being a Latina, I pronounced the word “tapas” with a native Spanish accent.

I started getting uncomfortable looks from the others, and finally one of them cleared his throat and said, “Um, you go to topless bars?”

For the record, I do not, but if you ever find yourself at a Spanish-themed topless bar–or at a restaurant with an eclectic wine list–here’s all you need to know about Tempranillo.

tempranillo
HOLA, ME LLAMO: Tempranillo, a red wine, gets its name from the Spanish word temprano, which means early (the grape ripens early). Depending on where you are, Tempranillo goes by a host of aliases: Cencibel, Ull de Lliebre, Tinto del País or Tinto del Toro in other regions of Spain; Tinta Roriz or Tinta Aragones in Portugal; and Tempranilla in Argentina.

MY ROOTS: Tempranillo’s birthplace is the Rioja region of Spain, but some folks think that it was brought there by French monks who were making the pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela. Tempranillo is the core grape of red Rioja wines, where it’s often blended with Garnacha. It’s also one of the main red grapes in Ribera del Duero, where it’s been used for more than 100 years at the prestigious Vega Sicilia winery. Today, Tempranillo is grown in Mexico, California, Italy, Argentina, Australia and South Africa.

ALL ABOUT ME: If you like cherry and plum on the palate, you’ll enjoy Tempranillo. Grapes that were grown in iron-rich soil may show some iron-mineral notes. When it’s aged, Tempranillo displays beautiful caramel, tobacco and tea leaf aromas. This is a dry wine with medium tannins, medium alcohol and medium to high acidity.

FOODS I LOVE: Break out the jamón serrano and the chorizo. Tempranillo is dreamy with a charcuterie plate, and if you happen to be at a tapas bar, it’s a great match for croquetas (ham croquettes), meatballs in tomato sauce and pinches (lamb or pork kabobs). Tempranillo is also tasty with roasted lamb and Indian food.

DO TRY THIS AT HOME: A bottle of Tempranillo can cost anywhere from $10 to $300. Some budget-friendly wines worth trying include: Luis Alegre Koden 2011, Sancho Barón 2009, Lar de Sotomayor Vendimia Seleccoinada 2010, and from Mexico, Alximia Alma 2012.

Something to ponder as you sip your next glass of Tempranillo: You can enjoy Tempranillo and still keep your top on, while getting your tapas on.

¡Salud!

 

Of Spanish Wines and Soccer Championships

6 Jul

Those of you who have followed Señorita Vino for a while know that she is an avid fan of fútbol, or soccer, as it’s known this side of the Atlantic (and the Rio Grande). In case you  were too busy watching NASCAR, last Sunday Spain secured its spot as a world class fútbol nation by slaughtering Italy 4-0 and winning the 2012 UEFA European Football Championship, known as Euro 2012. This of course follows their 2010 World Cup championship and their previous UEFA Euro victory in 2008.

“No hay 2 sin 3!

In honor of España’s recent triumph on the soccer field, it’s my pleasure to wax poetic about one of the Iberian nation’s top wine producing regions, Rioja. I attended a trade tasting of Rioja wines a couple of months ago, and these are some of the highlights. So sit back, pour yourself a glass of Tempranillo and read on…

Wines from Spain’s Rioja region.

The Rioja region is located in north central Spain and lies between mountain ranges. The river Ebro runs through it, resulting in fertile soil on its banks. Divided into three sub-regions, Rioja Alta, Rioja Baja and Rioja Alavesa, the diversity of the terrain and climate makes the region ideal for growing the versatile Tempranillo grape.

Tempranillo is the signature grape of the Rioja region.

Soils in the Rioja region are of three distinct types–chalky clay, alluvial (clay or silt carried by rivers and streams), or ferrous clay. ‘Ferrous’ comes from the Latin word for iron, and these soils are distinctive because of their reddish color from the high iron content. So why am I talking about dirt, when you came here to read about wine? Because the earth in which grapes are grown will have some influence on the flavor and style of the wine. This is one aspect of terroir, a word that comes from the French and is used in the wine world to describe the sense of place that typifies a wine. Climate, geology and farming techniques all play a role in the evolution of a wine.

Lovely Rioja (image courtesy of Vibrant Rioja)

One way you can identify a wine made from grapes grown in ferrous soil is a subtle metallic taste, not unlike the taste you get when you accidentally bite the inside of your cheek and taste a bit of blood. If I had one of those uber-cool product placement jobs, I would score points with wine geeks for placing a few bottles of Rioja in a future “Twilight” flick, maybe in a scene where Bella goes out for a drink with the girls after  finally leaving pasty, high-maintenance Edward and his erratic mood swings.

This is *not* a Spanish wine, but I thought the picture went well with the preceding sentence about moody vampires and girls’ night out. If you’re offended by profanity, just cover your eyes.

Although Rioja is best known for red wines made primarily from Tempranillo, Garnacha, Graziano and Mazuelo grapes, there’s a little something for white wine lovers, as well. White grapes grown in Rioja include Viura, Malvasia, Garnacha Blanca and Tempranillo Blanca. Now comes the timeless question, which foods go with wines from Rioja?

Hard cheese and charcuterie are a fine match for wines from the Rioja region.

My personal favorite is cheese and charcuterie. But Rioja wines pair beautifully with foods that won’t overwhelm their delicate flavors. More youthful Rioja wines, or those with the label “Crianza” or “Cosecha,” will complement a turkey dinner, pasta or roasted fish. Barrel fermented white Riojas pair well with fish, shellfish and salads. If you’re looking for something a little more robust in terms of wine and food, go with an older Rioja (look for “Reserva” or “Gran Reserva”), which will be an elegant fit for lamb, risotto, beef stews or game.

Spanish wines are an excellent value, so stock up!

And speaking of game, that brings us back to where we started, and that was Spain’s glorious Euro 2012 victory. You’ll feel victorious yourself when you pick up a bottle or two of  Spanish wine. If you remember anything at all from today’s post, it’s this: Spanish wines are an excellent value, and you won’t go broke adding a few bottles to your wine collection. You can get a quality bottle of Tempranillo for as little as $7 or $8. Of course, there are high-priced Spanish wines out there, and you trust fund babies may need to stock up.

So this weekend, my darlings, make it a point to raise a glass to España for its prowess on the pitch–and in the vineyard. ¡Salud!

A Spanish wine expert discusses wine for beginners

27 Mar

Pop quiz: Which country produces the most wine in the world? Hint: It’s not France or Italy. If you guessed Spain, felicidades, you are correct!

Spanish wine is experiencing a surge in popularity, as wine lovers around the world discover the quality and affordability of wines made in Spain. Juan Carlos Armenteros is the commercial director of Bodegas Entremontes, a Madrid-based cooperative representing wines made in Spain’s La Mancha region. Señorita Vino recently interviewed Juan Carlos about his passion for wine and his thoughts on how beginners can learn to enjoy its many pleasures. For those of you who prefer to read in English, scroll down and you’ll find a translation. ¡Salud!

Señorita Vino: ¿Cómo fue que empezaste a trabajar en la industria vinícola?

Juan Carlos Armenteros: Soy una persona emprendedora, en primer lugar aclararte que mi profesión es abogado. Sin embargo, viendo el crecimiento que estaba experimentando el sector del vino nos ofrecieron a través de un cliente el llevar la comercialización del vino embotellado a nivel mundial de una bodega de Castilla La Mancha con una producción de 40.000.000 de litros al año.

Photos provided courtesy of Vevinter and Bodegas Entremontes.

SV: Coméntanos un poco sobre vuestros vinos.

JCA: Son vinos elaborados con cariño y dedicación, no son nada astringentes por lo que tienen un paso de boca suave y agradable, cosa que muchas mujeres agradecen ya que cuando compran en nuestra tienda nos solicitan un vino suave que como ellas dicen no te arda la garganta. Nuestro enólogo ha conseguido un producto equilibrado sin que el vino pierda sus características.

SV: Hoy en día en los Estados Unidos, hay datos indicando que algunos consumidores de vino están buscando productos con precios justos. ¿Qué opinas sobre la calidad de un vino con respecto al precio?

JCA: No siempre hay que guiarse por los precios de las botellas ya que muchas veces una botella de vino puede tener un precio muy justo y sorprendernos con el producto que nos encontramos dentro. Hay que probar distintos varietales para poder apreciar las sensaciones que nos puede aportar una uva tempranillo o una uva syrah. Cada vino es una sensación distinta.

SV: ¿Cuáles consejos tienes para la persona que quisiera aprender más sobre el vino, pero quizás se sienta un poco intimidada?

JCA: Los vinos son seres vivos y un vino que a mi me puede gustar puede que a otra persona por diversos motivos no le sepa en boca igual que a mi. Lo primero que tiene que hacer es probarlo e intentar sacarle todas las denotaciones que el vino tiene, que son muchas. Que lo miren, lo observen, vean sus matices en el color, luego lo huelan e intenten separar todos los olores que un vino puede dar, los olores a frutas, a vainilla, a especias, etcétera. Y por fin que lo caten intentando que los olores percibidos se trasporten a la boca.

Bodegas Entremontes wines at a trade show in New York.

SV: ¿Qué le dirías a una persona que piensa que solo los expertos pueden apreciar el vino?

JCA: El vino es un producto al alcance de todos. Nadie es un experto o un ignorante por que los gustos son distintos. Hay muchas escuelas que ayudan a la gente a entender este producto y puede ser muy valioso que hagan algún curso de cata, no para saber beber el vino, sino para realmente saber apreciar lo que el vino les puede aportar, y sobre todo con qué comidas hay que tomar el vino. Durante un viaje que realicé por París aprendí que la comida se preparaba en función del vino que se iba a tomar en la comida, cosa que no realizamos nosotros. Primero pedimos la comida y después elegimos el vino, creo que en esto tenemos mucho que aprender de la cultura vinícola de francia.

SV:  De acuerdo. ¿Nos pudieras contar de una experiencia impresionante de tu vida que tenga que ver con el vino?

JCA: En una feria interna de nuestro país, una bodega había lanzado un nuevo vino espumoso con oro comestible. Como comprenderás las sensación que causó fue enorme, ya que la botella blanca y trasparente con el oro flotando parecía a esas bolas que los padres regalan a sus hijos que cuando las mueves ves nevar. La sensación era igual pero con oro. La verdad que fue impresionante.

Bodegas Entremontes' wine shop in Madrid. Photo courtesy of Vevinter and Bodegas Entremontes.


ENGLISH TRANSLATION:

Señorita Vino: How did you get started in the wine business?

Juan Carlos Armenteros: I’m an entrepreneur, but I am a lawyer by profession. Nevertheless, given how much the wine industry was growing, a client presented us with an opportunity to lead global marketing efforts for wines made by a winery in Castilla La Mancha, which was producing 40 million liters of wine a year.

SV: Tell us a bit about your wines.

JCA: They’re wines made with affection and dedication; they’re not at all astringent and they have a smooth and pleasant mouthfeel, something that many women appreciate, given that when they purchase wines from our store, they request a smooth wine that, in their words, won’t make your throat burn. Our enologist has found a product that is balanced yet maintains the wine’s characteristics.

SV: Today in the U.S., some data indicate that wine consumers are looking for reasonably priced products. What is your opinion on the relationship between a wine’s quality and its price?

JCA: You shouldn’t always be guided by the price of a bottle of wine, since often a bottle can be very reasonably priced and surprise us with what we find inside. You have to try different varieties to be able to appreciate the sensations a Tempranillo or a Syrah offer us. Each wine is a distinct sensory experience.

SV: What advice do you have for people who want to learn more about wine, but who may feel a bit intimidated?

JCA: Wine is a living thing, and a wine that I like may, for a variety of reasons, taste completely different to someone else. The first thing you have to do is try a wine with the goal of identifying all of the qualities a wine has, which are many. Look at the wine, observe it, notice the shades of color, then smell it and try to detect all of the scents a wine can have, such as fruit aromas, vanilla, spices, etc. Finally, taste the wine and try to transport the aromas you noticed to the palate.

SV: What would you say to someone who thinks only experts can appreciate wine?

JCA: Wine is a product that is within everyone’s reach. No one is an expert or ignorant, because  individual tastes vary. There are many schools that help people understand wine and it could be of value for someone to take a wine tasting course not to learn how to drink wine, but to really know how to appreciate what wine can offer them, especially when it comes to pairing food and wine. On a trip I took around Paris, I learned that meals were prepared according to the wine that would be served for dinner, something that we don’t do here. First we order dinner, and then we choose the wine. I think we have much to learn from the French wine culture in this regard.

SV: I agree. Could you share a wine-related experience from your life that left an impression on you?

JCA: I was at a Spanish wine fair, and a winery had launched a new sparkling wine that contained edible gold. As you can imagine, it caused a huge sensation, since the bottle was clear and transparent with floating flecks of gold. It looked like those snow globes that parents give their kids. It was the same sensation but with gold. It was truly striking.


Vinos and cheeses of España – a match made in pairing heaven

26 Oct

Your friendly guides on this tour of Spanish culinary delights (l to r): Norbert Wabnig, owner of the Cheese Store of Beverly HIlls, Antonio Martínez of Antalva Imports, and the Cheese Store's Tony, who leads the educational discussions on cheese at the monthly tastings. Photo courtesy of the lovely and talented Ulla Kimmig, herself a Cheese Store alumna. View more of her exquisite images at http://www.ullakimmig.de.

“…it made him to dream that he was already arrived at the kingdom of Micomicon, and that he was then in combat with his enemy, and he had given so many blows on the wine-bags, supposing them to be giants, as all the whole chamber flowed with wine.”  – Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, Don Quixote, Part I.

You literary types may recall this scene from Don Quixote, in which our hero’s valiant quest to slay a super-sized enemy turns into a sleepwalking fiasco involving gallons of spilled red wine and a furious Spanish innkeeper. My own hunt for the perfect Spanish wine and cheese pairing ended less chaotically at the Cheese Store of Beverly Hills. I’m happy to report that not a drop of Garnacha was wasted, and unlike Quixote’s angry host, the proprietors here plied me with serrano jam and marcona almonds.

On a recent Thursday night, I and nine other lovers of Spanish wines and cheeses gathered for The Cheese Store’s monthly wine and cheese pairing. The theme: “España.” Our mission: To sample 10 cheeses and seven wines from the land that brought us flamenco, paella and Pedro Almodóvar.

Importer Antonio Martínez of Antalva Imports, the consummate caballero, started us off with the Cava Blancher Capdevila y Pujol, a sparkling wine made in the méthode champenoise style, which, simply stated, means the wine was produced according to a traditional method developed in the Champagne region of France. I tasted pears; the tasting notes said green apples. Go figure. A future post will delve into the wine novice’s conundrum, “But I Taste Pears, Not Apples,” so stay tuned. For now, suffice it to say that the delicate bubbles did a gentle zapateado on the taste buds, and at $16 a bottle, this one’s definitely fiesta-worthy.

As for the cheeses, if Manchego is as far as your Spanish cheese repertoire goes, get ready to explore new horizons. Nine of them, to be exact: Nevat, Leonara, Tetilla, Pata Cabra, Idiazábal, Valdeón, Romáo, El Porfaio, Abrigo. The barnyard was well-represented here, with cheeses made from the milk of sheep, goats and cows.

Among my personal favorites was the Leonara, which is produced in Castilla y León from goat’s milk. The rich, buttery taste was a perfect contrast to the dry sparkle of the Cava Blancher. Picture yourself with a bottle of Cava, a wedge of Leonara, Javier Bardem (or Penélope Cruz), in a tucked-away Salamanca wine bar, and you’ll understand how otherworldly this pairing is. (El Full Disclosure: In case my husband is reading, I swear I went to the tasting with Debra, not Javier Bardem).

Before launching into another Tempranillo-soaked, bodice-ripping food fantasy, I want to mention a couple of the standout wines that were poured that evening. Yes, all of the wines were A-plus, but with all due respect to Cervantes, I want this post to be a little more concise than Don Quixote, parts 1 and 2.

Three flights of wine were poured with the first plate of five cheeses. The 2010 Maria Andrea Ribeiro Blanco, a crisp white wine made from a blend of Treixadura, Albariño, Godello and Loureira grapes, was a winner. I tasted melon (and so did the tasting notes!) and I was even able to identify malolactic fermentation from the creaminess on the palate. Malolactic fermentation, in case you’re wondering, is a process by which an acid that occurs naturally in crushed grapes is converted to lactic acid, which tastes smoother and gives the finished wine a buttery, creamy taste.

Pair the Maria Andrea with the Idiazábal cheese, a semi-hard cheese made from sheep’s milk smoked with beechwood. You’ll notice a subtle, smoky flavor with the nutty sweetness typical of cheeses made with sheep’s milk. The smokiness works beautifully with the acidity of the wine. De-li-cioso.

And speaking of delicious, the second plate of cheeses paired with an additional three flights of wine saw the marriage of two Spanish classics – Manchego cheese and Tempranillo wine. Manchego, as noted by Tony Princiotta, one of the Cheese Store’s High Priests of the Palate, “lives with red wines.”

For me, the ultimate fusion of flavors was the 2009 Viña Zangarrón “El Vino del Buen Amor” Toro D.O. (Tempranillo) paired with the Valdeón blue cheese, also from Castilla y León. This melt-in-your-mouth cheese is made from a blend of cow and goat milk. Wrapped in sycamore leaves, you’ll feel a bit of a spicy kick but not to the point that it dominates the delicate flavor, which I found more subtle than your typical blue cheese. The rich texture was a perfect match for the inky, full-bodied Toro, an organically made wine which, according to el Señor Martínez, boasts triple the antioxidant content of most red wines. I’ll drink to that!

To come full circle, “El Vino del Buen Amor” happens to be a phrase coined by the great 14th century Spanish poet, Juan Ruiz, in a collection of poems on romantic themes. Pair this wine with your favorite carne asada dish or a hearty seafood paella and watch love blossom (Javier Bardem optional).

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