Tag Archives: Sauvignon Blanc

Mucho Gusto! Get to know #SauvBlanc on #SauvignonBlancDay

24 Apr

You know the vino gods are smiling upon you when you get not one, but TWO vino holidays in the two weeks before a statistics final!  Today is Sauvignon Blanc Day, and I’m re-blogging this post from my ¡Mucho Gusto! series in honor of the occasion, and as an auspicious sign that I’ll ace the stat exam. Let’s do this!!

For those of you who don’t speak Spanish, mucho gusto is what you say when you first meet someone. It’s like “nice to meet you,” but it would translate more directly as “with great pleasure.”

Gusto has many meanings, including “taste” and “flavor,” so consider ¡Mucho Gusto! a delectable play on words and a way to familiarize yourself with wine. Without further ado, it is my great pleasure to introduce you to Sauvignon Blanc.

StSuperySauvBlanc
HOLA, ME LLAMO: Sauvignon Blanc is a white wine.

MY ROOTS: Sauvignon Blanc was born in France’s Bordeaux region. A bit of trivia – the grape variety hooked up with Cabernet Franc sometime in the 1700s and the result was Cabernet Sauvignon. Today, Sauvignon Blanc continues to thrive in Bordeaux. Because French wines are geographically labeled and not named for the actual grape, “Sancerre” and “Pouilly-Fumé” are 100 percent Sauvignon Blanc wines. Sauvignon Blanc was planted in other countries including New Zealand, the U.S. (California), Chile, Australia and Italy. Robert Mondavi coined the name Fumé Blanc, so if you see this on the grocery store shelf, it’s Sauvignon Blanc.

ALL ABOUT ME: Sauvignon Blanc is a dry wine made from an aromatic grape, hence its distinctive aroma. You may get nectarines, white peach, grapefruit, grass and herbs, gooseberries, and believe it or not, kitty pee. French Sauvignon Blanc may also display a flinty, gravelly minerality. Most Sauvignon Blanc is stainless-steel fermented, so you won’t get the woodsy, oaky notes you’d find in Chardonnay. It’s also known for its refreshing, crisp acidity.

FOODS I LOVE: You can’t go wrong with Sauvignon Blanc and seafood. The wine’s crispness complements the buttery texture of white fish and scallops. I’ve had it with oysters and it’s to-die-for amazing. Sauvignon Blanc is the ideal wine for vegetarian dishes. This is a great wine for salads, since the herb notes of the wine will match the crisp greens in the salad and the acidity matches vinaigrette dressing. For some Latin flair, pair Sauvingon Blanc with guacamole (the acidity of the wine “cuts” the creaminess of the guac) and spicy dishes like enchiladas and chile relleno. I love Sauvignon Blanc with Peruvian arroz con pollo (chicken in a cilantro sauce).

DO TRY THIS AT HOME: The beauty of Sauvignon Blanc is that you don’t have to break the bank to enjoy it. You can get a good bottle for $10 – $20. Of course, you can pay upwards of $150 for a classified Bordeaux blend. Some well-regarded labels include: Cloudy Bay, Kim Crawford and Matua Valley from New Zealand; Laville Haut-Brion, Alphonse Mellot and Pascal Jolivet from France; St. Supéry, Kunde and Matanzas Creek from California; Montes, Concha y Toro and Viña Leyda from Chile.

So here’s wishing you ¡Mucho Gusto! as you get to know Sauvignon Blanc. Until next time…

¡Salud!

¡Mucho Gusto! Get to know Sauvignon Blanc

20 Feb

Happy almost-weekend, chicas y chicos! You may recall last month’s debut edition of ¡Mucho Gusto!, where I introduce you to a particular type of wine. For those of you who don’t speak Spanish, mucho gusto is what you say when you first meet someone. It’s like “nice to meet you,” but it would translate more directly as “with great pleasure.”

Gusto has many meanings, including “taste” and “flavor,” so consider ¡Mucho Gusto! a delectable play on words and a way to familiarize yourself with wine. So here we go…

Sauvignon Blanc from New Zealand, Chile, California and France.

Sauvignon Blanc from New Zealand, Chile, California and France.

HOLA, ME LLAMO: Sauvignon Blanc is a white wine.

MY ROOTS: Sauvignon Blanc was born in France’s Bordeaux region. A bit of trivia – the grape variety hooked up with Cabernet Franc sometime in the 1700s and the result was Cabernet Sauvignon. Today, Sauvignon Blanc continues to thrive in Bordeaux. Because French wines are geographically labeled and not named for the actual grape, “Sancerre” and “Pouilly-Fumé” are 100 percent Sauvignon Blanc wines. Sauvignon Blanc was planted in other countries including New Zealand, the U.S. (California), Chile, Australia and Italy. Robert Mondavi coined the name Fumé Blanc, so if you see this on the grocery store shelf, it’s Sauvignon Blanc.

ALL ABOUT ME: Sauvignon Blanc is a dry wine made from an aromatic grape, hence its distinctive aroma. You may get nectarines, white peach, grapefruit, grass and herbs, gooseberries, and believe it or not, kitty pee. French Sauvignon Blanc may also display a flinty, gravelly minerality. Most Sauvignon Blanc is stainless-steel fermented, so you won’t get the woodsy, oaky notes you’d find in Chardonnay.  It’s also known for its refreshing, crisp acidity.

FOODS I LOVE: You can’t go wrong with Sauvignon Blanc and seafood. The wine’s crispness complements the buttery texture of white fish and scallops. I’ve had it with oysters and it’s to-die-for amazing. Sauvignon Blanc is the ideal wine for vegetarian dishes. This is a great wine for salads, since the herb notes of the wine will match the crisp greens in the salad and the acidity matches vinaigrette dressing. For some Latin flair, pair Sauvingon Blanc with guacamole (the acidity of the wine “cuts” the creaminess of the guac) and spicy dishes like enchiladas and chile relleno. I love Sauvignon Blanc with Peruvian arroz con pollo (chicken in a cilantro sauce).

DO TRY THIS AT HOME:  The beauty of Sauvignon Blanc is that you don’t have to break the bank to enjoy it. You can get a good bottle for $10 – $20. Of course, you can pay upwards of $150 for a classified Bordeaux blend. Some well-regarded labels include: Cloudy Bay, Kim Crawford and Matua Valley from New Zealand; Laville Haut-Brion, Alphonse Mellot and Pascal Jolivet from France; St. Supéry, Kunde and Matanzas Creek from California; Montes, Concha y Toro and Viña Leyda from Chile.

So here’s wishing you ¡Mucho Gusto! as you get to know Sauvignon Blanc. Until next time…

¡Salud!

 

Happy World #SauvBlanc Day

17 May

Darlings, let me be the first to wish you a very feliz World Sauvignon Blanc Day. And it’s such a happy occasion that I’m hittin’ the road for a little R&R in beautiful Palm Springs, California. Which is why I’m re-blogging last year’s Sauvignon Blanc Day post. I think you’ll enjoy it, and the information is still relevant today. Cheers and enjoy!

That’s right, chicas y chicos, another wine holiday! Can I get a salud?

Today is World Sauvignon Blanc Day, and to commemorate this auspicious occasion, I’ll be tasting four different Sauvignon Blancs from all corners of the world: Chile, New Zealand, France and California.

Sauvignon Blanc has a special place in my heart because it’s the first wine my husband and I discovered together when we were dating. If you join the celebration today, you’ll see why it’s so easy to love. Who knows, you may even channel your inner Señorita Vino and find true romance over a glass. (El Disclaimer: Señorita Vino makes no guarantees that you will find your soulmate today. So don’t quit the Match.com membership just yet).

There’s a Sauvignon Blanc for almost every palate. If you’re a passionfruit and nectarine kind of chica (or chico), try a Sauv Blanc from New Zealand’s Marlborough region. Oyster Bay is one of my personal favorites; you can find it for around $10 at a wine shop or grocery store.

 

Love the refreshing scent of grapefruit and fresh cut grass? Northern California has some beautiful Sauvignon Blancs with fresh citrus and herbal aromas. St. Supery is the California Sauv Blanc that my husband and I bonded over, and it happens to be the first wine club I ever joined back in 2000, the year my husband caved to relentless nagging and asked me to marry him. (El Full Disclosure: St. Supery was kind enough to provide this bottle for today’s festivities. And no, it’s not because I’m a member of their wine club. In fact, they had no idea I was a member until I did an El Full Disclosure on them and said so. Aren’t you glad I’m so ethical? St. Supery, you guys ROCK. And no, they didn’t pay me to say that.)

 

If you like mineral notes with olive and lemon aromas, France’s Loire Valley produces Savignon Blanc in the classic style. I found this one at Total Wine for $13.99.

Last but certainly not least, if you’re looking for a lighter-bodied wine (less alcohol) that you can sip casually on its own, you may want to show your amor for one of our own by trying a Chilean Sauvignon Blanc. A complete steal at $5.99.

You’ll hear people describe Sauvignon Blanc as having some characteristics beyond the aromas and flavors mentioned above. Bear in mind that the country in which the wine was made will have a big influence on what flavors you’ll detect. Some people can smell guava, cilantro, fig, bell pepper, lemongrass and dill. If you’re drinking a Sauvignon Blanc that was aged in oak, you’ll notice some aromas that are associated with wood, such as vanilla and sweet spices.

One scent that you may also detect is kitty pee. Yep, you read it right, and no, I don’t make this stuff up. Sounds weird, I know, but I have actually smelled this in some Sauvignon Blancs, and it’s not a flaw (nor did they let the cats loose in the winery); it’s just a characteristic of the grape.

 

On that note, let’s talk food pairing. The crisp acidity of Sauvignon Blanc can act as a palate cleanser, making it a perfect starter. That same acidity makes it a good match for salads with vinaigrette dressings, and it ‘cuts’ through foods with cream or butter-based sauces. It’s also a great match for ethnic foods with a little kick, like Thai or Indian dishes. The wine’s lower alcohol content feels refreshing after the burn from spicy-hot seasonings. And it goes great with guacamole.

Sauvignon Blanc complements just about every cheese I love. For you purists, the classic pairing is Sauvignon Blanc with a French chèvre, or goat cheese. The acidity in the wine matches the tang in cheeses made with goats’ milk.

So there you have it. Stop reading, go pour yourself a glass of Sauvignon Blanc and join the fiesta¡Salud!

Peruvian restaurants expand their wine lists

11 Jan

Pan pipe music, tarnished brass tumis and fuzzy little llama dolls are standard fare at Peruvian restaurants in the U.S., but donde está el wine list?

Look! A tarnished tumi! (No restaurants were dissed in the making of this photo. This guy happens to hang in  Casa de Señorita Vino)

Look! A tarnished tumi! (No restaurants were dissed in the captioning of this photo. This tumi lives in Casa de Señorita Vino)

Here’s a summary of my wine experience at Peruvian restaurants over the past couple of decades:

SERVER: Can I get you anything to drink?

ME: Do you have a wine list?

SERVER: There’s red and white.

ME: Yes, the Peruvian flag is elegant in its simplicity. And I ADORE that little vicuña on the crest!

SERVER: Mujer, you could use a pisco sour.

ME: Actually, I’d like a glass of wine. Do you have any Sauvignon Blanc?

SERVER: No. There’s just red or white.

ME:  About that pisco sour…

So now you know why I’m blogging and not writing for Letterman. The good news is that this scary scenario is starting to fade. More and more Southern California Peruvian restaurants are adding wine lists, and it’s not just the fancy novo-andino joints with the minimalist decor, hipster bar scene and ear-splitting decibel level.

The wine list at Casa Inka in Fountain Valley, Calif. features Malbecs and New Zealand Pinot Noirs, among other choices.

The wine list at Casa Inka features Malbecs and New Zealand Pinot Noirs, among other choices.

Case in point: Last night I met up with the familia at Casa Inka in Fountain Valley, Calif. (and no, this is not a sponsored post. Casa Inka, if you’re reading this, de nada. Maybe we could get a papa rellena on the house next time we’re there?). We were seeing my brother off before he headed back east after coming home for the holidays.

Located in a nondescript Orange County strip mall, Casa Inka stands out for its Jimmy-Buffet-esque facade: A glass-enclosed bamboo loft housing a couple of stuffed parrots and faux jungle flora. Inside, the decor is a blend of Peruvian kitsch–grinning llamas, serranita dolls, and a looming, oversized photo of Machu Picchu)–sprinkled with some artistic photos of Lima’s trendier neighborhoods and the city of Cusco.

Casa Inka's facade stands out in an otherwise ordinary strip mall.

Casa Inka’s facade stands out in an otherwise ordinary strip mall.

On the menu are popular dishes you’d see at most Peruvian eateries, and–holy cau-cau!–a new wine list!

Here’s a sampling of what we ordered and the wines we paired them with:

APPETIZERS

Anticuchos are skewered, marinated chunks of beef heart. Yummy!

Anticuchos are served with a side of chimichurri sauce. Yummy!

Authentic anticuchos are skewered morsels of marinated beef heart. I paired these with the Ampakama Malbec 2009. The wine’s bold fruit contrasted nicely with the saltiness of the marinade.

Yuca a la huancaína:

Yuca a la huancaína: Fried cassava in a spicy cheese sauce

Yuca, or cassava, is popular throughout Latin America. At Casa Inka, it’s prepared in the huancaína style, smothered in a rich sauce of fresh cheese and ají amarillo, served with slices of hard-boiled egg and black olives. The zingy acidity of the Rata Sauvignon Blanc 2011 from New Zealand was a perfect match for this creamy dish.

MAIN COURSE

Arroz con pollo is ideal for cilantro lovers.

Arroz con pollo, a cilantro lover’s dream.

Señor Jim ordered his standby dish, arroz con pollo, with his standby wine, Sauvignon Blanc. The New Zealand Rata’s grassy notes complement the cilantro in this traditional chicken dish. The wine list features the Rata Pinot Noir 2008, which also works.

Lomo saltado appears on just about every Peruvian restaurant menu.

Lomo saltado appears on every Peruvian restaurant menu in the galaxy.

Ask my brother how he judges the quality of a Peruvian restaurant, and he’ll answer in two words: Lomo saltado. The  classic Peruvian stir-fry pairs beautifully with Chile’s Torreón de Paredes Carmenere 2009, a red wine with elegant tannins [NOTE: The wine list spells the name as “Torreón Parpois,” but since I actually  fact-check my material, I found it as Torreón de Paredes, so that’s what I’m sticking with].

Tacu-tacu, a dish that's not commonly found on the menu in U.S. Peruvian eateries.

Tacu-tacu, a dish you won’t see on too many U.S. Peruvian menus.

This, my friends, is what you want to eat before you set out to hike the Inca Trail. Otherwise, you’ll gain about 10 pounds approximately 30 minutes after you scrape the last remnants from your plate. Tacu-tacu consists of stir-fried beans and rice topped with a steak and an egg over-easy, with a little bit of fried plantain for the heft–I mean heck of it. One of the classic pairing rules is to match the weight of your meal with the weight of your wine. A robust Zin, California’s Dancing Bull Zinfandel 2009, is the ideal choice.

DESSERT

The Machu Picchu of alfajores towers...

The Machu Picchu of alfajores towers.

A South American version of a dessert from Moorish Spain, the alfajor is a shortbread and dulce de leche sandwich sprinkled with powdered sugar. Damn, I think my thighs just grew an inch after writing that. Here’s where I channel my inner Señor Jim and pair this with an espresso. Oh, and I cannot tell a lie, so  I confess I don’t remember whether there were dessert wines on the wine list. It’s probably because I was too busy chismeando with my dad (NOTE TO NON-SPANISH-SPEAKING READERS: “Chismear” is to gossip).

My brother models a mini-alfajor.

My brother offers up a mini-alfajor.

Wait–I’m not finished! I’m pushing 900 words here, but no one ever said Peruvians were succinct. I dedicate this post to my super-fantástico brother, whose visits to California are always much too short. Nino darling, may the road be paved with lomo saltado, and be wary of strangers bearing cans of peanut brittle. Besos, P.

Casa Inka, 8610 Warner Ave., Fountain Valley, CA. (714) 847-7555. Open 7 days a week for lunch and dinner.

A winery that honors veterans

12 Nov

When Josh Laine returned to Livermore, California in 2007 after serving in the Marines in Iraq, he knew he wanted a job that required hands-on work. His girlfriend at the time worked for a winery and  introduced him to the agricultural side of the wine business. This is how Valor Winery was born.

“I didn’t know anything about wine,” Laine says. “I didn’t even really know how it was made,” he laughs. But this didn’t stop him from buying an acre of land and investing $15,000 into the business, all in one year. It didn’t take too long for him to figure out he needed help.

“Some of the Marines I served with weren’t doing too well with their lives,” Laine recalls. “I wanted to help them as a way to keep my own life from going down a bad path, so I asked them to help me plant vines and clean equipment.”

Soon, the wives and girlfriends of the veterans began telling Laine that their partners seemed less angry at home. Also, vineyard work proved to be so physically demanding that some of the men were able to sleep more restfully and experience fewer war-related nightmares.

Josh Laine works the vines at Valor Winery.

Today, Valor Winery employs more than 50 veterans who do anything from marketing and sales to mapping out new vineyards, maintaining the vines and providing IT support. “So  many veterans are coming back now [from overseas],” notes Laine. “For some of them, this is a pit-stop and they work here for a few months. We help them move on to something bigger and better. But others have been here the whole five years and love it.”

Valor Winery produced a 2010 Sauvignon Blanc,  Chardonnay,  Zinfandel and Sangiovese. The wines retail for $15 to $40. All of the proceeds go to the winery’s Vets & Vines Foundation, whose goal is to give veterans with physical and emotional limitations an opportunity to learn a trade in a supportive environment.

Besides producing “awesome wine,” Laine says that Valor Winery provides “stability and camaraderie. We’re helping veterans transition back into civilian life.”

Valor Winery is open to the public the first weekend of each month and by appointment. The wines are available in some Northern California stores and can be ordered directly from the winery by calling (925) 321-0373. Look for them on Facebook.

I dedicate this post to all of the women and men who have served our country, especially my husband, Señor Jim, who served in the U.S. Army 101st Airborne Division from 1968-1969 in Vietnam.

A take-along wine cheat sheet

17 Sep

On a recent visit to Señor Jim’s family in Seattle, I accompanied my amazing step-daughter-in-law (a.k.a. Miss Jenny) on a quick grocery store trip to buy wine for dinner. Miss J and I were  navigating the super-sized aisles of a super-grande market, where the wine section seemed to go on for miles. Miss J turned to me and said, “You should make a cheat sheet so that I’ll know how each type of wine tastes.”

Miss J, from your lips to Señorita Vino’s ears.

Here for your shopping pleasure are general aroma and flavor profiles for the eight most common wines you’re likely to see at a restaurant or in the wine section at the grocery store.

——————————————CLIP ‘N SAVE!-———————————————

 SEÑORITA VINO’S OFFICIAL WINE FLAVOR CHEAT SHEET 

1. WHITE WINES

Chardonnay – If you like buttery, oaky wine, choose Chardonnay. The wood notes come from the oak barrels used for aging Chardonnay. Keep in mind that some Chards  are aged in stainless steel and will not have the oaky notes. If the grapes were grown in a warmer growing climate, you’ll notice tropical fruit aromas. Cooler climate Chardonnays will have pear, apple and melon aromas.

Sauvignon Blanc – Grapefruit, grass and green pepper are aromas commonly associated with Sauvignon Blanc. If you buy a Sauv Blanc from France, you may notice some mineral notes such as flint. If the label says that the wine is oak-aged, you’ll get some toasty, smoky notes as well. Sauvignon Blanc has a crisp, acidic flavor profile, whereas most Chardonnays will feel more creamy.

Pinot Grigio (a.k.a. Pinot Gris) – Most Pinot Grigios are unoaked, so if you’re not a fan of  wood aromas, this is a good choice. You may notice hints of apple, peach, citrus and minerals. The acidity ranges from low to high. How to tell the difference? Pinot Grigios from cooler climates will be more acidic, while those from warmer climates less so.

Riesling – Floral aromas of jasmine and honeysuckle, with fruit notes of apricot and nectarine, characterize this wine. If you can detect a ‘petrol’ aroma, don’t worry – it’s normal! HEADS-UP: It’s a myth that all Rieslings are sweet. Sweetness depends on how the wine was fermented, when the grapes were picked, and other factors. If the bottle says ‘late harvest,’ it will taste sweet. Sometimes you’ll see ‘dry Riesling’ on the label. Remember that ‘dry’ is the word used to describe wines that are not sweet.

2. RED WINES

Cabernet Sauvignon – This wine is high in tannin, which means you’ll get an astringent, puckering sensation in the mouth. Some people are sensitive to tannins and can get headaches or symptoms similar to hay fever. Cabernet Sauvignon has black cherry aromas, black currant and blackberry. You’ll also detect dark chocolate and tobacco. Cabernets aged in new oak may display coffee and caramel notes.

Merlot – Less tannic than Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot has plum, blueberry and minty aromas. You may also get some coffee and chocolate notes. Merlot sales took a hit after the movie Sideways, but it remains one of the more popular red wines. Often you’ll see a Merlot-Cabernet Sauvignon blend, which will be less tannic than a Cabernet Sauvignon and have a broader range of flavors.

Pinot Noir – Naturally low in tannins, this is a good choice for people who don’t care for the puckering effect of tannic wines. Pinot Noir is known for its raspberry and strawberry aromas, as well as red flowers such as rose and carnation. Older Pinots will develop what are known as barnyard aromas. And yes, it smells like what you’d smell in the stall or on the floor of a barnyard. It’s nowhere near as asqueroso as it sounds. But if you’d rather avoid it, go for a younger Pinot.

Syrah (a.k.a. Shiraz) – Another highly tannic wine, but with aromas that are much different from Cabernet Sauvignon. Choose Syrah if you like hints of violets, black pepper, lavender, blackberry, anise and smoked meat.

Today is World Sauvignon Blanc Day

21 Jun

That’s right, chicas y chicos, another wine holiday! Can I get a salud?

Today is World Sauvignon Blanc Day, and there’s  an all-day party on Twitter (#SauvBlanc). To commemorate this auspicious occasion, I’ll be tasting four different Sauvignon Blancs from all corners of the world: Chile, New Zealand, France and California.

Did somebody say fiesta?

Sauvignon Blanc has a special place in my heart because it’s the first wine my husband and I discovered together when we were dating. If you join the celebration today, you’ll see why it’s so easy to love. Who knows, you may even channel your inner Señorita Vino and find true romance over a glass. (El Disclaimer: Señorita Vino makes no guarantees that you will find your soulmate today. So don’t quit the Match.com membership just yet).

There’s a Sauvignon Blanc for almost every palate. If you’re a passionfruit and nectarine kind of chica (or chico), try a Sauv Blanc from New Zealand’s Marlborough region. Oyster Bay is one of my personal favorites; you can find it for around $10 at a wine shop or grocery store.

New Zealand is credited with starting the Sauvignon Blanc revolution in the 1970s.

Love the refreshing scent of grapefruit and fresh cut grass? Northern California has some beautiful Sauvignon Blancs with fresh citrus and herbal aromas. St. Supery is the California Sauv Blanc that my husband and I bonded over, and it happens to be the first wine club I ever joined back in 2000, the year my husband caved to relentless nagging and asked me to marry him. (El Full Disclosure: St. Supery was kind enough to provide this bottle for today’s festivities. And no, it’s not because I’m a member of their wine club. In fact, they had no idea I was a member until I did an El Full Disclosure on them and said so. Aren’t you glad I’m so ethical? St. Supery, you guys ROCK. And no, they didn’t pay me to say that.)

California Sauvignon Blancs feature herbal and citrus notes.

If you like mineral notes with olive and lemon aromas, France’s Loire Valley produces Savignon Blanc in the classic style. I found this one at Total Wine for $13.99.

A classic style from France, the birthplace of Sauvignon Blanc.

Last but certainly not least, if you’re looking for a lighter-bodied wine (less alcohol) that you can sip casually on its own, you may want to show your amor for one of our own by trying a Chilean Sauvignon Blanc. A complete steal at $5.99.

Me encantan los vinos chilenos.

You’ll hear people describe Sauvignon Blanc as having some characteristics beyond the aromas and flavors mentioned above. Bear in mind that the country in which the wine was made will have a big influence on what flavors you’ll detect. Some people can smell guava, cilantro, fig, bell pepper, lemongrass and dill. If you’re drinking a Sauvignon Blanc that was aged in oak, you’ll notice some aromas that are associated with wood, such as vanilla and sweet spices.

One scent that you may also detect is kitty pee. Yep, you read it right, and no, I don’t make this stuff up. Sounds weird, I know, but I have actually smelled this in some Sauvignon Blancs, and it’s not a flaw (nor did they let the cats loose in the winery); it’s just a characteristic of the grape.

“Can I get some sardines with my Sauvignon Blanc?”

On that note, let’s talk food pairing. The crisp acidity of Sauvignon Blanc can act as a palate cleanser, making it a perfect starter. That same acidity makes it a good match for salads with vinaigrette dressings, and it ‘cuts’ through foods with cream or butter-based sauces. It’s also a great match for ethnic foods with a little kick, like Thai or Indian dishes. The wine’s lower alcohol content feels refreshing after the burn from spicy-hot seasonings. And it goes great with guacamole.

Sauvignon Blanc complements just about every cheese I love. For you purists, the classic pairing is Sauvignon Blanc with a French chèvre, or goat cheese. The acidity in the wine matches the tang in cheeses made with goats’ milk.

So there you have it. Stop reading, go pour yourself a glass of Sauvignon Blanc and join the fiesta. ¡Salud!

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