Tag Archives: Beaujolais Nouveau

Feliz #BeaujolaisNouveauDay

20 Nov

It’s the third Thursday in November, and that can only mean one thing: time to get your Beaujolais on, chicas y chicos! Today is Beaujolais Nouveau Day, so here is the 411 on Beaujolais  before you hit the store. This post is an updated version of what I like to call an oldie but a goodie. Enjoy!

These days, Beaujolais Nouveau is everywhere but in my glass. It’s 5 p.m. and I’m dashing to get this post up before you head to the grocery store to buy your celebratory bottle of Beau’.

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You’ve probably noticed a surge of advertising space dedicated to the arrival of France’s Beaujolais Nouveau. Much like a visit from a favorite tía or cousin, the landing of this colorfully packaged wine on our shores is heralded with fanfare and buzz. Tens of thousands of dollars go into marketing campaigns and fancy grocery store displays. Why all the fuss? One word: Timing.

Unlike most wines, Beaujolais Nouveau is ready to drink almost immediately after fermentation. You may recall that fermentation is the process by which the sugar in the grape juice is gobbled up by hungry yeast organisms, resulting in…alcohol! Without fermentation, all we’d have is grape juice. A huge volume of Beaujolais is bottled weeks after fermentation, exported from France et voilà, on grocery store shelves starting, like clockwork, the third Thursday in November.

Before we go any further, I should note that red Beaujolais Nouveau is the wine that triggers all the excitement this time of year. Beaujolais (sans the Nouveau) is a red or white wine, also from the Beaujolais region of France, that you can find year-round.

Red Beaujolais wines are generally made from the Gamay grape using a technique called carbonic maceration. All you need to know about carbonic maceration for now is that it gives wine a tropical fruit aroma, which can be a blessing or a curse.

For a while, Beaujolais got a bad rap from the wine community. It was considered too fruity, too thin, too mass-produced, too unsophisticated, and on and on…In fact, some folks still feel that way.

One of the great things about Beaujolais, however, is that you can serve it with various kinds of food, especially at Thanksgiving. Since the wine is not aged in wood, there are barely any tannins to overpower your turkey (the lack of tannins, by the way, is one reason the wine won’t age well). Also, the alcohol content is light to moderate, so the wine pairs well with spicier foods (hello, Thanksgiving tamales!).

And for you budding Julia Childs and Jacques Pepins out there, you can cook with it. Use it to make anything from poached pears to chicken wings. Talk about versatility! I’ll leave you with this thought–now that you know what Beaujolais Day is, why not make it an annual tradition? Gather your friends and some bite-sized tamalitos, serve ’em up with a bottle of Beaujolais Nouveau and start the holiday season right. It beats the heck out of standing in line at the mall at 4 a.m. on Black Friday. ¡Salud!

8 #Thanksgiving #wines for all budgets

27 Nov

It’s the day before Thanksgiving. The day that feels as if no one has gone grocery shopping the entire year. The day that plays out like an epic flash mob at grocery stores across the nation, with armies of people seemingly synchronizing their smart phones for  3 p.m. to begin spontaneously stocking up for the apocalypse.

This is not the day you want to stress out about finding the right wine for your Thanksgiving  fiesta, chicas y chicos. Because Señorita Vino loves you mucho, here’s a quick guide to help you shop for wine this week.

And in the interest of El Full Disclosure, none of the wines mentioned here paid me for the illustrious privilege of being featured on this list. In fact, I purchased these wines with my own hard earned dólares.

White Wines

1. Chateau Ste. Michelle Riesling 2011. $6.99. This wine is off-dry, so you’ll get some sweetness on the palate. You’ll also get lovely peach and citrus notes with a hint of minerality. Riesling is a wine that “plays well with others,” so you’ll be able to pair it with a variety of Thanksgiving dishes.

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2. Blue Fin Gewürztraminer 2012. $3.99 You’ll get a bouquet of white florals and some spicy peach notes, along with light sweetness on the palate. The finish is a little on the short side, but hey, it’s $3.99!

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Like your white wines dry? Here are a couple of alternatives:

2. Zocker Paragon Vineyard Gruner Veltliner 2010. $19.00  This one’s a winner; I’ve been enjoying its delicate melon and fruity aromas all year long. There’s a crisp acidity and a lovely minerality that would complement your turkey, turducken, or if you’re so inclined, tamales.

zocker

Zocker Paragon Vineyard Riesling 2009. $20.00  This Central Coast version of a French Alsatian classic has an elegant, peachy flavor with the typical Riesling petrol aroma. It has a lingering, clean mineral note and will complement just about any Thanksgiving dish, including spicier foods that appear on multicultural Thanksgiving menus such as my own.

ZRiesling NV

Red Wines

1. Estancia Pinot Noir 2012. $12.99  This is a fruity Pinot Noir that’s easy to drink and pairs well with a variety of foods, which is why Pinot Noir is one of my favorite Thanksgiving wines. And the price is right, too.

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2. Argyle Pinot Noir 2012. $27.00 ($19.99 at Trader Joe’s).   After spending last September in Oregon’s Willamette Valley for Señor Jim’s family reunion, I’m convinced that some of the best New World Pinots come from Oregon. You’ll get raspberries, red cherries and a touch of spice with mild tannins.

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3. A Portela Mencía 2011. $16.99. If you want to add some international flavor to your Thanksgiving feast, this Spanish blend is the ticket. Gorgeous black fruit with hints of violet and and a whisper of vanilla. You’ll enjoy granite minerality and a lingering finish.

MENCIA

4. Beaujolais Nouveau. You should still be able to find Beaujolais Nouveau out there, which has become a bit of a tradition with the typical American Thanksgiving dinner. Prices vary, and if you want a quick and easy-to-understand story on Beaujolais Nouveau, check out Vino 101: Beaujolais Basics.

No matter what’s in your glass, may you enjoy a happy Thanksgiving in the company of those you love most.

¡Salud!

Vino 101: Beaujolais Basics

21 Nov

These days, Beaujolais Nouveau is everywhere but in my glass. It’s 10 a.m. and I’m  dashing to get this post up before you head to the grocery store with your mile-long Thanksgiving dinner list.

Unless you’ve been laser-focused on Black Friday hype, you’ve probably noticed a surge of advertising space dedicated to the arrival of  France’s  Beaujolais Nouveau. Much like a visit from a favorite tía or cousin, the landing of this colorfully packaged wine on our shores is heralded with fanfare and buzz. Tens of thousands of dollars go into marketing campaigns and fancy grocery store displays. Why all the fuss? One word: Timing.

Pairs well with others: Beaujolais works with most Thanksgiving dishes.

Unlike most wines, Beaujolais Nouveau is ready to drink almost immediately after fermentation. You may recall that fermentation is the process by which the sugar in the grape juice is gobbled up by hungry yeast organisms, resulting in…alcohol! Without fermentation, all we’d have is grape juice. A huge volume of Beaujolais is bottled weeks after fermentation, exported from France et voilà, on grocery store shelves starting, like clockwork, the third Thursday in November.

Before we go any further, I should note that red Beaujolais Nouveau is the wine that triggers all the excitement this time of year. Beaujolais (sans the Nouveau) is a red or white wine, also from the Beaujolais region of France, that you can find year-round.

Red Beaujolais wines are generally made from the Gamay grape using a technique called carbonic maceration. I’ll explain: Carbonic maceration is a type of fermentation that happens inside an individual, unbroken grape, with no help from yeast or bacteria. All you need to know about carbonic maceration is that it gives wine a tropical fruit aroma, which can be a blessing or a curse.

For a while, Beaujolais got a bad rap from the wine community. It was considered too fruity, too thin, too mass-produced, too unsophisticated, and on and on…In fact, some folks still feel that way.

One of the great things about Beaujolais, however,  is that you can serve it with various kinds of food, especially at Thanksgiving. Since the wine is not aged in wood, there are barely any tannins to overpower your turkey (the lack of tannins, by the way, is one reason the wine won’t age well). Also, the alcohol content is light to moderate, so the wine pairs well with spicier foods (hello, Thanksgiving tamales!).

And for you budding Julia Childs and Jacques Pepins out there, you can cook with it. Use it to make anything from poached pears to chicken wings. Talk about versatility! And versatility is what brings me to shut down the computer and drive 40 miles south to assume the role of sous chef to my father’s phenomenal Thanksgiving feast.

May you enjoy a flavorful, fun, fantástico Thanksgiving, and raise a glass of [fill in your favorite wine here] in gratitude for all of the blessings in your life. ¡Salud!

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