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#Food and #wine pairings for International #TempranilloDay ¡Salud!

10 Nov

Chicas y chicos, today is International Tempranillo Day, and we’re gonna hop into the Vino Time Machine for this “Mucho Gusto” post from a couple years ago that will give you everything you need to know about Tempranillo. ¡Salud!

My favorite wine anecdote is one I could share during one of those silly business “icebreakers” where you have to tell a group of complete strangers your most embarrassing moment. I was talking vino at a party with some people I’d just met and I mentioned a Tempranillo I had tried at a new tapas bar that had opened nearby. Being a Latina, I pronounced the word “tapas” with a native Spanish accent.

I started getting uncomfortable looks from the others, and finally one of them cleared his throat and said, “Um, you go to topless bars?”

For the record, I do not, but if you ever find yourself at a Spanish-themed topless bar–or at a restaurant with an eclectic wine list–here’s all you need to know about Tempranillo.

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Image courtesy of Rioja Wine.

HOLA, ME LLAMO: Tempranillo, a red wine, gets its name from the Spanish word temprano, which means early (the grape ripens early). Depending on where you are, Tempranillo goes by a host of aliases: Cencibel, Ull de Lliebre, Tinto del País or Tinto del Toro in other regions of Spain; Tinta Roriz or Tinta Aragones in Portugal; and Tempranilla in Argentina.

MY ROOTS: Tempranillo’s birthplace is the Rioja region of Spain, but some folks think that it was brought there by French monks who were making the pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela. Tempranillo is the core grape of red Rioja wines, where it’s often blended with Garnacha. It’s also one of the main red grapes in Ribera del Duero, where it’s been used for more than 100 years at the prestigious Vega Sicilia winery. Today, Tempranillo is grown in Mexico, California, Italy, Argentina, Australia and South Africa.

ALL ABOUT ME: If you like cherry and plum on the palate, you’ll enjoy Tempranillo. Grapes that were grown in iron-rich soil may show some iron-mineral notes. When it’s aged, Tempranillo displays beautiful caramel, tobacco and tea leaf aromas. This is a dry wine with medium tannins, medium alcohol and medium to high acidity.

FOODS I LOVE: Break out the jamón serrano and the chorizo. Tempranillo is dreamy with a charcuterie plate, and if you happen to be at a tapas bar, it’s a great match for croquetas (ham croquettes), meatballs in tomato sauce and pinches (lamb or pork kabobs). Tempranillo is also tasty with roasted lamb and Indian food.

DO TRY THIS AT HOME: A bottle of Tempranillo can cost anywhere from $10 to $300. Some budget-friendly wines worth trying include: Luis Alegre Koden 2011, Sancho Barón 2009, Lar de Sotomayor Vendimia Seleccoinada 2010, and from Mexico, Alximia Alma 2012.

Something to ponder as you sip your next glass of Tempranillo: You can enjoy Tempranillo and still keep your top on, while getting your tapas on.

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#Wine and #Halloween candy pairings are frightening. There. I said it.

28 Oct

The scariest thing about Halloween is not goblins, ghosts or Donald Trump’s hair. It’s Halloween candy and wine pairings. I mean, seriously. Why would I waste a perfectly good glass of wine on a bag of candy corn?

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No offense to candy-wine-pairing aficionados (and the serial “infographickers” that inspire them), but nothing makes me want to reach for the Pepto more than the thought of chasing a mouthful of miniature marshmallows with a glass of Pinot Noir. And in case you’re wondering, that was an actual pairing suggestion I found in the Googlesphere.

So as October winds down, I’m calling Halloween candy/wine pairing for what it is–an unpalatable excuse to sell wine. Now that I’ve finally put it out there, I will sit back with a glass of Riesling and wait for the backlash.

[Sound of crickets chirping]

While I wait, I wanted to introduce you to two Rieslings I just met over dinner. Relax and Blue Fish. I know, they sound like they could be  80s indie-pop bands. But they’re German Rieslings done in two different styles. Relax is on the sweet side, while Blue Fish is dry.

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What I thought was clever about the packaging is that you can tell how sweet or dry the wines are by looking at the back label:

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And if you’re as frazzled as I am after a long week of work insanity and midterms, these wines calm you down even before you open the bottle.

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All joking aside, I gotta tell you that the Blue Fish was a fan-TAB-ulous pairing with my dinner: a sesame-crusted seared ahi with mashed potatoes and asparagus delivered by Four Daughters restaurant in Manhattan Beach. You’ve probably guessed that it’s time for El Full Disclosure: The vino was a free product sample sent to me by a publicist, but (say it with me, chicas y chicos) the opinions stated in this post are mine. And while we’re on this topic, Four Daughters did NOT comp my dinner. Nor send me a press release. Heck, they have no idea Señorita Vino exists or that I’m writing about them. So there you have it.

But back to the wine, if you’re into wine ratings, the 2013 Blue Fish won 91 points from Wine Enthusiast magazine. I sampled the 2014–a solid value wine for about $8.50 a bottle.

The Relax was, well, a great way to relax after a satisfying dinner on a Thursday night at home. This one’s light but sweet enough to enjoy solo. You could even have a glass for dessert, although technically it’s not a dessert wine. Tell ya what–on Monday when the chiquitos come a-knockin’ for their sweet treats, pour yourself a glass and sip your own sweet reward. And remember–if you dare to pair it with candy, Señorita Vino will come haunt you.

¡Salud!

Mucho Gusto! Get to know #SauvBlanc on #SauvignonBlancDay

24 Apr

You know the vino gods are smiling upon you when you get not one, but TWO vino holidays in the two weeks before a statistics final!  Today is Sauvignon Blanc Day, and I’m re-blogging this post from my ¡Mucho Gusto! series in honor of the occasion, and as an auspicious sign that I’ll ace the stat exam. Let’s do this!!

For those of you who don’t speak Spanish, mucho gusto is what you say when you first meet someone. It’s like “nice to meet you,” but it would translate more directly as “with great pleasure.”

Gusto has many meanings, including “taste” and “flavor,” so consider ¡Mucho Gusto! a delectable play on words and a way to familiarize yourself with wine. Without further ado, it is my great pleasure to introduce you to Sauvignon Blanc.

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HOLA, ME LLAMO: Sauvignon Blanc is a white wine.

MY ROOTS: Sauvignon Blanc was born in France’s Bordeaux region. A bit of trivia – the grape variety hooked up with Cabernet Franc sometime in the 1700s and the result was Cabernet Sauvignon. Today, Sauvignon Blanc continues to thrive in Bordeaux. Because French wines are geographically labeled and not named for the actual grape, “Sancerre” and “Pouilly-Fumé” are 100 percent Sauvignon Blanc wines. Sauvignon Blanc was planted in other countries including New Zealand, the U.S. (California), Chile, Australia and Italy. Robert Mondavi coined the name Fumé Blanc, so if you see this on the grocery store shelf, it’s Sauvignon Blanc.

ALL ABOUT ME: Sauvignon Blanc is a dry wine made from an aromatic grape, hence its distinctive aroma. You may get nectarines, white peach, grapefruit, grass and herbs, gooseberries, and believe it or not, kitty pee. French Sauvignon Blanc may also display a flinty, gravelly minerality. Most Sauvignon Blanc is stainless-steel fermented, so you won’t get the woodsy, oaky notes you’d find in Chardonnay. It’s also known for its refreshing, crisp acidity.

FOODS I LOVE: You can’t go wrong with Sauvignon Blanc and seafood. The wine’s crispness complements the buttery texture of white fish and scallops. I’ve had it with oysters and it’s to-die-for amazing. Sauvignon Blanc is the ideal wine for vegetarian dishes. This is a great wine for salads, since the herb notes of the wine will match the crisp greens in the salad and the acidity matches vinaigrette dressing. For some Latin flair, pair Sauvingon Blanc with guacamole (the acidity of the wine “cuts” the creaminess of the guac) and spicy dishes like enchiladas and chile relleno. I love Sauvignon Blanc with Peruvian arroz con pollo (chicken in a cilantro sauce).

DO TRY THIS AT HOME: The beauty of Sauvignon Blanc is that you don’t have to break the bank to enjoy it. You can get a good bottle for $10 – $20. Of course, you can pay upwards of $150 for a classified Bordeaux blend. Some well-regarded labels include: Cloudy Bay, Kim Crawford and Matua Valley from New Zealand; Laville Haut-Brion, Alphonse Mellot and Pascal Jolivet from France; St. Supéry, Kunde and Matanzas Creek from California; Montes, Concha y Toro and Viña Leyda from Chile.

So here’s wishing you ¡Mucho Gusto! as you get to know Sauvignon Blanc. Until next time…

¡Salud!

What not to do at a wine tasting

3 Feb

Psssst…you with the wineglass. Yeah, you! Don’t tell anyone, but I’m supposed to be doing statistics homework right now.

I know what you’re going to say.  “Writing a wine blog post has nothing to do with MBA coursework.” Well, yes and no. It turns out that my school not only puts on this wine-derful fundraiser, the Annual Wine Classic, but it also makes its own wine! Check it out:

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Last weekend, I got to attend the 34th annual Wine Classic, my first big wine tasting event since last fall. Boy, did I need a drink…but I digress. I often get asked what one should do at a wine tasting. The answer is: have fun. There are, however, a few things you should not do.

At the risk of being expelled from my program, I am about to share with you some faux pas I observed at the event. I’ve turned these no-no’s into guidelines that not only will enhance your own experience, but possibly the experience of your fellow wine lovers. Consider this your “Rules of the Road” for wine tasting. Are you ready? Let’s go!

1. Do not wear perfume. If you’ve learned anything from Señorita Vino all these years, it’s that most of what you “taste” when you sip wine is experienced through your sense of smell. The best way to completely mess this up is to wear fragrance of any kind. Don’t do it. Chicos, that includes you.

2. Don’t ask for a second or third pour. This is a wine tasting, not a bar. Winemakers bring just enough wine to ensure everyone gets a taste. That little booklet or handout you get at most wine tasting events is your best amigo. Circle or check off the wines you like, maybe grab a business card from the winemaker or representative, and try to find a bottle of that wine at a wine shop. If it’s a boutique winery, you may be able to buy it from their website.

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3. Don’t bring a gigantic purse. This is the sound of you with your ginormous designer bag, trying to squeeze through a sardine-like gantlet of fellow wine tasters: SPLASH. Leave the tote bag at home and opt for something smaller that will leave your hands free to hold a wineglass and small food plate–and not jostle other wine lovers as you walk by.

4. Event planners, don’t use vinyl to cover floors or tables. My only gripe about the Wine Classic itself was the noxious odor emitted by the plastic tarp covering the floor of the university’s sports complex. I get that you have to protect the expensive wood floor, but the overpowering smell of vinyl was, well, overpowering. Maybe air out the tarp a few days before, or find a covering that doesn’t give off a smell.

5. Don’t be a snob about it. Ah, the grandiose swirler, the smug connoisseur, the chummy “insider.” These textbook archetypes of Vinus Snobus can forget that they’re in a space with hundreds of other wine lovers. Once they get to the front of the line, they decide it’s a great time for a fireside chat with the winery staff. There’s nothing wrong with striking up a conversation with winery reps. Just be considerate of your fellow wine lovers and make sure there’s not a mile-long line of people waiting patiently behind you for a taste of wine.

"You're my little macaron, oh yes you are!" (image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons by Pierre Marcolini)

“You’re my little macaron, oh yes you are!” (image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons by Pierre Marcolini)

6. Don’t hoard the macarons. Or the cheese. Or the charcuterie. Like many wine tasting events, the Wine Classic featured a couple of large cheese and fruit stations, and some dessert and coffee stands. Classy! But not so classy was the lady stuffing macarons and chocolate almond bark into two ‘grande’ paper coffee cups. I kid you not. I was crushed, because I actually had a dream about macarons the night before. I couldn’t find macarons in the ol’ dream dictionary, but I suspect it means there’s a trip to Paris in my future. Or maybe not. Either way, I didn’t get my macaron. Waaah.

I think that covers it, darlings. Have I left anything out? if you have any additional tips, do share! Until next time, ¡Salud!

¡Mucho Gusto! Get to know #Riesling

3 Oct

One of my favorite wine-tasting-gone-wrong stories happened a year after starting my blog when I was invited to join a group of women bloggers on a day of vino tasting in the Santa Ynez Valley.

In the tasting room of a winery whose name I won’t mention, the gentleman pouring our wine opened a bottle of Riesling and said, “You girls will love this one because it’s sweet. All Rieslings taste sweet.” True story.

Of course, not all “girls” love sweet wine, and certainly not all Rieslings are sweet. At the risk of making waves in this group I was just getting to know, I decided to very diplomatically note that some Rieslings are in fact dry.

You can guess where that led. Annoyed that I had corrected him, in a condescending tone he argued that ALL Rieslings ARE INDEED sweet. I decided not to ruin the convivial mood and dropped the matter. To prepare you in case you find yourself at the same winery with the same twit pouring your wine, it’s my pleasure–no, it’s my duty–to present the 411 on Riesling.

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HOLA, ME LLAMO: Riesling (pronounced REES-ling, not REEZ-ling)

MY ROOTS: According to the Oxford Companion to Wine, the earliest known mention of Riesling was found in Germany’s Rheingau region on an invoice dating back to 1435. The Riesling grape is believed to have originated in Germany, and DNA testing shows that it is an offspring of the grape Gouais Blanc. Noteworthy Riesling is produced in Germany, Austria and  in France’s Alsace region. Riesling  also is made in New World countries including Canada, Australia’s Clare Valley, and in the states of Oregon, Washington, California, and New York’s Finger Lakes region. Riesling vines have hard, resilient wood, which allows them to thrive in cold climates such as New York, Canada and Germany.

ALL ABOUT ME:  Riesling is a white wine that can be made in a variety of styles, from bone dry to sweet. The classic aromatic profile is a heady mix of lychee, white florals, citrus, white peaches and a distinctive petrol or kerosene smell in older wines. Rieslings have low to medium alcohol, rarely exceeding 12.5 percent ABV. This is a wine with a crisp acidity. Cool-weather Rieslings are especially zingy, and in Germany and Canada, some grapes are allowed to freeze on the vine to produce a beautifully sweet Icewine. The sweetness of German Rieslings is ranked according to a classification system that ranges from Kabinett (dry) to Trockenbeerenauslese (super-sweet). In France’s Alsace region, grapes may be harvested late (Vendage Tardive on the label), producing a rich, honeyed wine. Sometimes, but not always, American Rieslings will have “Dry Riesling” on the label if it’s, well, dry. When in doubt, ask your wine merchant or server to be sure.

FOODS I LOVE: Riesling is a versatile wine that pairs with all kinds of foods. Try a sweet or off-dry Riesling with spicy Mexican or Thai food to cool the burn. Rieslings go well with charcuterie plates, roasted duck and mildly salted cheeses. It also works with crab, shrimp or lobster. And Riesling holds the distinction of being one of the few wines that pairs nicely with eggs.

DO TRY THIS AT HOME: Riesling can cost anywhere from $16 to $60 a bottle. See last week’s post for four Finger Lakes Rieslings you may want to try. For Old World Rieslings, you can’t go wrong with Germany’s Dr. Loosen from the Mosel region. And from France’s Alsace region, I enjoyed the 2012 Hubert Meyer Riesling.

What are some of your favorite Rieslings? Don’t be shy–let me hear from you. Enjoy the weekend and as always, ¡Salud!

Riesling, New York style #FLXWine

27 Sep

If you’re verklempt about Derek Jeter’s last day as a Yankee, I’ve got something to help cheer you up. Besides being home to one of baseball’s most legendary teams, New York is also where you’ll find the Finger Lakes AVA (American Viticultural Area), billed as “North America’s premier cool-climate wine growing region” by the Finger Lakes Wine Alliance.

Riesling FLX Map

Even better, I’m about to introduce you to four rockin’ Rieslings from the Finger Lakes region. ‘Scuse the short notice, but in about 50 minutes, there’s a Twitter party to launch the 2013 vintage, with the hashtag #FLXRiesling. Can’t make it? No worries–you can read up on four of the wines here, and if you like what you see, you can always enjoy them after the fiesta.

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Before we go on, here’s El Full Disclosure: I received these four bottles as samples from the fine folks at the Finger Lakes Wine Alliance. I was not paid to write this post, and the opinions expressed below are my own. So with that said, here’s the scoop on the Finger Lakes, or FLX.

For you science geeks, the Finger Lakes were carved out by glaciers over hundreds of thousands of years. This not only affects the soil where the grapes are grown, but the large bodies of water help moderate temperature year round, protecting the grapes from extremes. Riesling grapes are grown on 848 acres, and 220,000 cases of Riesling are produced annually. Each of the 115-plus wineries produces two to three styles of Riesling.

Next week, I’ll provide more details about Riesling in “Mucho Gusto: Get to Know Riesling,” so stay tuned. In the meantime, you can get acquainted (in alphabetical order) with each of the four Finger Lakes Rieslings I tried.

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2013 Fulkerson Estate Semi-dry Riesling

Fulkerson Winery owner Sayre Fulkerson is a descendant of Caleb Fulkerson, a Revolutionary War veteran who established a farm on the west side of Seneca Lake in 1805. Grapes were first grown on the property in the 1830s, and winemaking operations formally began in 1989. The 2013 Fulkerson Estate Semi-dry Riesling displays peach and floral notes with crisp acidity and a distinct minerality. The alcohol by volume is 12 percent. Learn more at http://www.fulkersonwinery.com.

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2013 Lakewood Vineyards 3Generations Riesling

Lakewood Farm was a derelict peach and apple orchard on the west side of Seneca Lake when former dentist Frank Stamp purchased the property in 1951. He started planting grapes the next spring, and in 1989 the Stamp family opened the Lakewood Vineyards winery. With crisp minerality, a mild sweetness and delicate floral aromas, this classic Riesling has 11.6 percent alcohol by volume and retails for $19.99. For more details, visit http://www.lakewoodvineyards.com.

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2013 Red Newt Cellars Dry Riesling

Red Newt Cellars is located on the east side of Seneca Lake in the town of Hector. The property is home to the winery and a bistro. Founded in 1998, the winery produces mostly Rieslings, and the 2013 delivers aromas of pineapple and grapefruit, with apricot and lemon on the palate. Dry with a refreshing acidity, the wine has 11.7 percent alcohol by volume. If you pay attention to ratings, the 2012 vintage scored 89 points in Wine Spectator. Visit http://www.rednewt.com for deets.

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2013 Wagner Vineyards Dry Riesling

I’m all about girl power, and Wagner Vineyards’ winemaker, Ann Raffetto, has been with the winery for 30 years. She’s a graduate of UC Davis’s acclaimed viticulture and enology program, and she holds a degree in fermentation science (it’s called enology now). The  2013 dry Riesling has 11.6 percent alcohol by volume. Crisply acidic with a hint of petrol, lime and delicate florals, this is a wine that pairs with anything from roast chicken to chicken vindaloo. Get the 411 at http://www.wagnervineyards.com

Now go get your Riesling on, chicas y chicos. And see you next week with a more in-depth exploration of Riesling. ¡Salud!

 

 

¡Mucho Gusto! Get to know Lagrein

19 Sep

It’s been some time since my last “¡Mucho Gusto!,” so today I’d like you to meet Lagrein. If you’re new to Señorita Vino, ¡Mucho Gusto! is an ongoing series of posts about a specific varietal wine. And if you don’t speak the language of Cervantes, mucho gusto translates as “nice to meet you.”

I first tasted Lagrein with one of my very first wine instructors, an Italian man who very promptly won the hearts, minds and libidos of all the single ladies in the class. One student literally fell for him, as in she lost her balance while speaking to him and landed in an undignified pile at his feet. True story. And yes, it was as embarrassing to watch as it sounds. I suspect there was vino involved, but who am I to judge?

You, on the other hand, are welcome to judge the merits of Lagrein. So without further ado, heeeeeeeere’s Lagrein!

Lagrein

 

HOLA, ME LLAMO: Lagrein (pronounced la-GRINE)

MY ROOTS: Lagrein is a red wine from the predominantly German-speaking Alto Adige, the northernmost part of Italy’s Trentino-Alto Adige region and just a stone’s throw from Austria. Alto Adige is sometimes referred to as Südtirol, which is German for South Tyrol.

The name “Lagrein” is believed to have come from the Lagarina valley in Trentino. Its earliest mention dates back to the 1600s, when it was noted in the records kept by Benedictine monks from a monastery in Alto Adige. Today, Lagrein is grown on a mere 750 acres in Alto Adige. DNA testing shows that Lagrein is related to Teroldego, an ancient grape variety from Trentino.

ALL ABOUT ME: Lagrein is bold and flavorful. Young winemakers are experimenting with different styles, so you can find Lagreins with tannins that won’t tear up your palate. One of the first things you’ll notice when you pour a glass is the brilliant shade of violet. You’ll get blackberry, plum and dark chocolate aromas with earthy minerality. You’ll also detect some crisp acidity, which offsets the chewy tannins a bit.

Note that “Lagrein Scuro” or “Lagrein Dunkel,” which mean “dark Lagrein,” are the terms used to distinguish red Lagrein from the rosé version, which is called “Lagrein Rosato” or “Lagrein Kretzer.”

FOODS I LOVE: The firm tannins in Lagrein make this a great match for meaty dishes. Think New York steak, carnitas, beef stew, prosciutto, wild boar. It’s nice with aged cheeses, too.

DO TRY THIS AT HOME: You can find Lagrein for anywhere from $13-$50 a bottle. Here are some you may want to try: 2011 J. Hofstatter Lagrein Alto Adige (this one received 88 points from Wine Spectator, if you’re into ratings); 2011 Erste e Neue Lagrein; 2010 Cantina Zterlan “Gries” Lagrein.

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