Tag Archives: Wines from northern Italy

¡Mucho Gusto! Get to know Soave

4 Apr

Feliz Friday, beautiful people! I bet you didn’t know that helping Señorita Vino ace her WSET Level III Advanced exam was on your to-do list today. I’m scrambling to learn my Italian wines this weekend, and writing this month’s ¡Mucho Gusto! post is actually helping me organize my thoughts on Soave, Italy’s most important white wine.

So sit back and pour yourself a refreshing glass of Soave tonight.  Your friends will be impressed with your knowledge, and I am eternally grateful for the opportunity to use you as my virtual study group. ¡Salud!

This grapes used in this Soave Classico were grown in 100 percent volcanic soil.

This grapes used in this Soave Classico were grown in 100 percent volcanic soil.

HOLA, ME LLAMO: Soave is an Italian white wine made from the Garganega grape.

MY ROOTS: Soave is the name of a zone in the Veneto region of northeastern Italy. In 1968, Soave was given a DOC designation, or Denominazione di Origine Controllata. A DOC means that those wines are considered high quality under European wine laws. As for the grape itself, it is mentioned as early as 1304 in the works of the Italian Petrus Crescentiis, perhaps the world’s first wine writer. Grapes grown in the hillside regions of Soave’s Classico zone are said to produce the highest quality wines.

ALL ABOUT ME: Soave DOC is a dry white wine. It should be noted that for a while, Soave was considered pretty “meh.” That changed in 2002 with various DOCG designations. In essence, DOCG grants “best of the best” status to Italian wines made in that region. So back to Soave…if you’ve got a quality Soave on the palate, you’re going to taste green plums, almonds and a touch of citrus. You’ll also pick up some lovely minerality and chamomile flowers.  Recioto di Soave is made from dried Garganega grapes, so if you’re sipping Recioto, it’s going to be decadently sweet. In a good way, of course.

FOODS I LOVE: Soave is a textbook example of pairing wine with foods from the same region. The Veneto’s eastern boundary is the Adriatic Sea, a reminder that a textbook example of an Italian city, Venice, is part of the Veneto region. Serve Soave with seafood pasta dishes, shellfish, shrimp scampi, and just about any kind of fish. It’s also great with a cheese plate. For a Latin twist, pair it with chupe de camarones (a Peruvian seafood chowder), chicken tamales or menudo.

DO TRY THIS AT HOME: Soave generally won’t break the bank. The wine pictured above sells for $13.99 but tastes like a more expensive wine. You may see some Soaves in the $30 range, but you’ll find quite a bit in the $15-$17 range. Recommended labels include Roberto Anselmi, Umberto Portinari, Fratelli Pasqua and Inama.

Is there a wine you really want to get to know? Share it in the comments and you may see it in a future ¡Mucho Gusto!

 

 

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