Tag Archives: Los Angeles wineries

Mexican Independence Day, L.A. style (and #vino, of course)

16 Sep

Gimme a ¡Salud! if you think Mexican Independence Day is on May 5.

(Cue sound of crickets chirping).

That’s right, chicas y chicos–contrary to what certain beer companies that shall remain nameless will tell you, September 16 (not Cinco de Mayo), marks 206 years since the famous grito, or cry,  uttered from a church in the little Mexican town of Dolores Hidalgo sowed the seeds for a revolution.

I can’t think of a better way to celebrate a revolution than with a big glass of vino. And I can’t think of a better place this side of the Rio Grande to enjoy a unique blend of Mexican heritage and wine than in Los Angeles’s own San Antonio Winery.

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Yours truly had the distinct honor of being a guest at a recent wine and cheese pairing at L.A.’s oldest producing winery [El Full Disclosure: I was invited to attend a tasting event as a guest of San Antonio’s, however the opinions expressed are 100% mine, all mine!].

For you history buffs, San Antonio Winery was established near downtown Los Angeles in 1917 by Italian immigrant Santo Cambianica. Santo’s nephew, Stefano Riboli, came to the U.S. at age 15 to learn how to make wine from his uncle. Ten years later in 1946, Stefano married Italian hottie Maddalena Satragni.

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L to R: Stefano and Maddalena Riboli, Uncle Santo (photo credit: San Antonio Winery)

Today, the Riboli family continues to produce a diverse portfolio of wines, including sparkling, white, rosé and red, as well as classic and chocolate (yes, chocolate!) port. Ay, ay, ay

But back to the wine and cheese pairing. Let me start by saying wine and cheese pairings at San Antonio Winery are a far cry from the ones we’ve all suffered through at some point (we’ve all been there–a plate of jack, cheddar and some weird amalgamation of the two cut into little cubes, air-drying on paper plates). After just one San Antonio wine and cheese event, my pairing bar was set irreversibly high.

And it’s not just cheese (not that there’s anything wrong with just cheese). We’re talking Manchego quesadilla with Pinot Noir. Havarti and smoked andouille sausage on a hot dog bun with Petite Syrah. Danish blue with apricot preserves on a scone and a glass of Pinot Grigio.

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Helloooo, Havarti! (…and hola, andouille sausage!)

Speaking of glasses, wine and cheese pairings a la San Antonio Winery mean you get…wait for it…a full pour. I speak the truth, darlings. No silly splashes here and there. Heck, they even come around and offer you another hearty round.

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Now that’s what I call a glass of wine!

These think-outside-the-box pairings come from Wonder-Somm Corey Arballo, wine steward at San Antonio Winery. Oh, and there’s a restaurant onsite at the winery, which means anytime you visit, you can get abbondanza Italian fare to go with your vino and not have to stumble around town looking for a hunka hunka hot lasagne. But that’s the topic of a future post.

Vino lovers at the pairing I attended got lucky–we all were serenaded by Mariachis as we savored our wine and cheese. I’ll drink to that!

Wine and cheese pairings at San Antonio Winery are offered a few times year. The next one is Sunday, Oct. 9 from 1 to 3:3o p.m. Whether or not you can make it, remember that you can visit the winery year-round and have a traditional wine tasting (save some room for lasagne afterwards!).  Bring an appetite, a thirst for award-winning wine and tell ’em Señorita Vino sent you.

¡Salud!

 

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Reyes Winery – the only Latino-owned winery in L.A.

18 Dec

About an hour’s drive north of downtown Los Angeles, the radio signal in my car begins to fade. Minutes later as I exit the 5 freeway at Agua Dulce Canyon Road, a country western station pipes in crystal clear.

The twangy guitar and folksy melody provide a fitting soundtrack for the winding country roads that lead to Reyes Winery, the only Latino-owned winery in Los Angeles County, and one of a few wineries 45 minutes away from the heart of downtown L.A.

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Robert Reyes, winemaker and general manager, warmly welcomes me and a crew from ABC-7, who are here to do a segment on Señorita Vino for their Sunday morning television program, Vista LA [NOTE: the show aired Nov. 17, but if you’re in L.A. County, you might catch a re-broadcast in the late evening or early morning].

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Smile! You’re on Vista LA.

Besides making wine, Reyes, a native of the Dominican Republic, paints and scuba dives. Yet this Renaissance man’s passion for wine stems not from idyllic trips to Europe’s wine regions, but from a beloved aunt.

“I’ve loved wine since I was a kid in the Dominican Republic,” Reyes says. “My 92-year-old aunt would visit us in Santo Domingo and she’d bring a bottle of her homemade fruit wine. As kids, we’d get a taste.”

Reyes was smitten, and as an adult, he started making his own version of his aunt’s fruity concoction.

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Robert Reyes in his tasting room.

What started as a passion developed into a serious interest, and Reyes began schooling himself in the art of winemaking by reading books. He also consulted other winemakers and took courses at UC Davis, which has a world-renowned viticulture and enology program.

He planted the first vineyard at Reyes Winery in 2004, and harvested a small crop the next year. Today, the boutique winery produces 3,500 cases annually from five varietals: Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Syrah, Chardonnay and Muscat.

On display in the tasting room are Reyes’ own paintings of the vineyard and scenes evocative of his homeland. Also visible are some of the awards his wines have garnered.

“Our wines have been on the market for the past two-and-a-half years, and in that time we’ve earned medals in every competition we’ve entered,” Reyes notes. To date, the winery has won 29 medals.

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Despite the honors, Reyes remains grounded. And he’s quick to dismiss wine snobbery. “There are a lot of people out there who, for whatever reason, have this attitude about wine knowledge,” he says. “If you taste a wine and like it, then it doesn’t matter what anyone else says about it.”

When asked about wine consumption among Latinos, Reyes observes that Hispanics are definitely upping their wine drinking. He attributes the increase to the fact that Latinos are becoming more affluent as they integrate into American culture.

Vines are planted on 16 acres of land.

Vines are planted on 16 acres of land.

“Where we once worked in the fields, we now have the means to be able to make wine and especially drink wine,” states Reyes. “It’s a social phenomenon that we’re all participating in.”

Reyes Winery. 10262 Sierra Highway, Agua Dulce, Calif. 91390. (661) 268-1865. Open for tastings Saturday and Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Book a tasting and winery tour at www.reyeswinery.com.

Reyes Winery wines are available through its wine club, at certain Santa Clarita Valley restaurants and at Whole Foods Market. 

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