A take-along wine cheat sheet

17 Sep

On a recent visit to Señor Jim’s family in Seattle, I accompanied my amazing step-daughter-in-law (a.k.a. Miss Jenny) on a quick grocery store trip to buy wine for dinner. Miss J and I were  navigating the super-sized aisles of a super-grande market, where the wine section seemed to go on for miles. Miss J turned to me and said, “You should make a cheat sheet so that I’ll know how each type of wine tastes.”

Miss J, from your lips to Señorita Vino’s ears.

Here for your shopping pleasure are general aroma and flavor profiles for the eight most common wines you’re likely to see at a restaurant or in the wine section at the grocery store.

——————————————CLIP ‘N SAVE!-———————————————

 SEÑORITA VINO’S OFFICIAL WINE FLAVOR CHEAT SHEET 

1. WHITE WINES

Chardonnay - If you like buttery, oaky wine, choose Chardonnay. The wood notes come from the oak barrels used for aging Chardonnay. Keep in mind that some Chards  are aged in stainless steel and will not have the oaky notes. If the grapes were grown in a warmer growing climate, you’ll notice tropical fruit aromas. Cooler climate Chardonnays will have pear, apple and melon aromas.

Sauvignon Blanc - Grapefruit, grass and green pepper are aromas commonly associated with Sauvignon Blanc. If you buy a Sauv Blanc from France, you may notice some mineral notes such as flint. If the label says that the wine is oak-aged, you’ll get some toasty, smoky notes as well. Sauvignon Blanc has a crisp, acidic flavor profile, whereas most Chardonnays will feel more creamy.

Pinot Grigio (a.k.a. Pinot Gris) - Most Pinot Grigios are unoaked, so if you’re not a fan of  wood aromas, this is a good choice. You may notice hints of apple, peach, citrus and minerals. The acidity ranges from low to high. How to tell the difference? Pinot Grigios from cooler climates will be more acidic, while those from warmer climates less so.

Riesling - Floral aromas of jasmine and honeysuckle, with fruit notes of apricot and nectarine, characterize this wine. If you can detect a ‘petrol’ aroma, don’t worry – it’s normal! HEADS-UP: It’s a myth that all Rieslings are sweet. Sweetness depends on how the wine was fermented, when the grapes were picked, and other factors. If the bottle says ‘late harvest,’ it will taste sweet. Sometimes you’ll see ‘dry Riesling’ on the label. Remember that ‘dry’ is the word used to describe wines that are not sweet.

2. RED WINES

Cabernet Sauvignon - This wine is high in tannin, which means you’ll get an astringent, puckering sensation in the mouth. Some people are sensitive to tannins and can get headaches or symptoms similar to hay fever. Cabernet Sauvignon has black cherry aromas, black currant and blackberry. You’ll also detect dark chocolate and tobacco. Cabernets aged in new oak may display coffee and caramel notes.

Merlot – Less tannic than Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot has plum, blueberry and minty aromas. You may also get some coffee and chocolate notes. Merlot sales took a hit after the movie Sideways, but it remains one of the more popular red wines. Often you’ll see a Merlot-Cabernet Sauvignon blend, which will be less tannic than a Cabernet Sauvignon and have a broader range of flavors.

Pinot Noir - Naturally low in tannins, this is a good choice for people who don’t care for the puckering effect of tannic wines. Pinot Noir is known for its raspberry and strawberry aromas, as well as red flowers such as rose and carnation. Older Pinots will develop what are known as barnyard aromas. And yes, it smells like what you’d smell in the stall or on the floor of a barnyard. It’s nowhere near as asqueroso as it sounds. But if you’d rather avoid it, go for a younger Pinot.

Syrah (a.k.a. Shiraz) – Another highly tannic wine, but with aromas that are much different from Cabernet Sauvignon. Choose Syrah if you like hints of violets, black pepper, lavender, blackberry, anise and smoked meat.

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12 Responses to “A take-along wine cheat sheet”

  1. Pattie Cordova September 17, 2012 at 4:20 pm #

    LOVE this. I’m going to print it out and put it inside my cupboard. Thanks for making it so easy!

  2. Maura September 17, 2012 at 5:34 pm #

    Ahh! Thanks for creating a clip & save cheat sheet! I shy away from drinking too much wine because I have a sensitivity to tannins (they tend to give me migraines, ugh) and always feel like a noob when I have to ask my server if a particular kind of wine will be OK for me to drink at dinner. I’m going to print and study this baby! Thanks!

  3. Ruby DW (@RubyDW) September 17, 2012 at 8:02 pm #

    This is great! It does get overwhelming tryin to find a wine I will enjoy and sometimes staff isn’t available.

  4. vianney September 18, 2012 at 2:59 pm #

    Thanks~ I’m sharing with all my friends!!

  5. desumama September 18, 2012 at 5:16 pm #

    Love this clip and save… I am always reminding myself to venture out of the chards and merlot.

  6. Eva Smith™ (@Eva_Smith) September 18, 2012 at 6:15 pm #

    Love the cheat sheet!

  7. Presley's Pantry September 18, 2012 at 9:50 pm #

    This is the best cheat sheet ever…. I tend to pour a glass of white for myself. Now I will know how to tell the difference.

  8. Comiendo en LA September 18, 2012 at 11:36 pm #

    Gracias por esta fabulosa información! Me encanta lo bien que explicas cada uno de los vinos!

  9. Cristina September 19, 2012 at 5:42 pm #

    Great idea! I always have to search online to pair wine with food. This cheat sheet is going to be a huge help. Thank you!!

  10. Gitanas September 26, 2012 at 10:42 am #

    I wouldve loved for you to add about malbecs, carmeneres and zinfandels which are often left behind….thanks!

    • Pamela September 26, 2012 at 1:16 pm #

      You’re a mindreader, Gitanas! I will be featuring those and some other popular varietal grapes on a “Cheat Sheet Part Dos.” Stay tuned and thanks for reading!

  11. Bren @ Flanboyant Eats™ October 7, 2012 at 9:31 am #

    You’re such an innovator! If I didn’t know any better, I’d clip this and keep in my wallet! But you just gave me an idea! Imma send you an email. I think you’ll love!

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